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[GAME 1] 2-7 Triple Draw


2-7 Triple Draw is a draw poker game where the player with the best low hand wins the pot. Each player is dealt five cards to start, and then has the chance to discard any cards in their hand in exchange for new cards during three separate draw rounds.


Playing for the Low Hand

Before you get started, please note the following about playing 2-7 Triple Draw:
• Flushes, straights and pairs count against your hand
• The Ace is always considered a high card

This means that the hand A-2-3-4-5 is not considered a straight, but T-J-K-Q-A is.
The best possible hand in 2-7 Triple Draw is 7-5-4-3-2 (not of the same suit), also known as "the nuts" or "the wheel". Low hands are always counted from the highest card to the lowest card, so it's usually the highest card in your hand that counts the most. For example, 9-7-6-4-3 is a better hand than T-7-6-4-2.
If the high cards are of equal value, the next highest card (or cards) comes into play. For example, 9-7-6-4-3 beats 9-8-6-4-3.


Blinds

Like flop-based games such as Hold 'em, draw games feature blinds to stimulate action at the table. The small blind and big blind are assigned to the players to the left of the dealer button, which determines the order in which cards are dealt.

The Deal and First Round of Betting

Once the blinds are posted, the hand is underway. With 2-7 Triple Draw, five cards are dealt face down to each player in the hand, starting with the player to the left of the dealer button.
After the cards are dealt, the first round of betting ensues. Starting with the player to the left of the big blind, each player has the option to fold their hand, call the current bet or raise it up! If no one raises, the player in the big blind has the option to check their hand, meaning that player makes no bet but still retains their hand. All players will bet betting at the lower limits (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits).
The amount you can bet or raise is determined by the betting structure of the game you're playing:

• If the game is No Limit, you can bet all of your chips at any point in the hand
• If the game is Fixed Limit, you can bet in increments of a predetermined betting limit that corresponds to the size of the blinds

Draw #1
When the first round of betting is complete, all players still in the hand have the option to discard any or all of their cards and draw new ones. Choose which cards you want to discard, when it's your turn to act.
If you prefer not to discard any cards, you have the option to "stand pat".
Once all players have discarded, new cards will be drawn from the deck and each player will be dealt the same number of cards which they discarded.
Drawing during the Round #1 will be betting at the lower limit. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)


***** Please note: In draw games, it's possible for more cards to be needed than are available in the deck. In this case, a reshuffling of the deck will take place.
Betting and Drawing Rounds #2 and #3

After the first draw, another round of betting takes place, beginning with the first player to the left of the button. If no one has bet, you have the option to check your hand or make a bet. If you're facing a bet, you have the option to fold, call or raise.

Once the second round of betting is complete, draw #2 takes place. As with the first draw, any player remaining in the hand has the opportunity to discard any or all of their cards, or stand pat.

After new cards are drawn, a third round of betting takes place, followed by draw #3. Draw #3 is your last chance to make the best hand you can.
During the Rounds #2 and #3 you will be betting at the higher limit. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)


The Final Betting Round and Showdown

Following the third draw, one last round of betting takes place. This round of betting follows the same format as the previous rounds.

When the last round of betting is complete, a showdown takes place with any players still remaining in the hand. The player with the best low hand wins the pot! If there is a tie for the best hand, the pot will be split equally amongst the tied players.

**** Reshuffling the Deck

In draw games, it's possible there will be more cards needed than are available in the deck. When all of the original 52 cards from the deck have been distributed, any folded or discarded cards may be reshuffled and used for a draw.
The rules for reshuffling the deck in draw poker games are as follows:
• During a draw round, the remainder of the original deck is first distributed to the players in the order in which they discarded
• If there are insufficient cards remaining in the original deck during a draw round, a reshuffle is required
• For the first draw or games with only one draw: the deck is reshuffled using the folded cards first, and then the discards if necessary
• For the subsequent draw rounds: the deck is reshuffled using the folded cards and discards from previous draw rounds first, and then the discards from the current round if necessary
Please note that it is possible for you to draw a card you have previously discarded if discards are needed for the reshuffle.

 

 

[GAME 2] Fix Limit Hold’em


Each player starts with two hole cards. There are three rounds of community cards. These are dealt face up, for every player to use, with betting after each round.


Each new hand begins with a small blind, a big blind, and a round of betting. Preflop will begin betting at the lower limit. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits) In Limit Games each betting round has a fixed bet. There is a maximum of three reraises per betting round.


Once the first round of betting is complete, the dealer then puts out the first three community cards, or "the flop". There is another round of betting at the lower limit.
The dealer then puts out the fourth community card or "the turn". There is a round of betting at the higher limit (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)

The dealer then puts out the fifth community card or "the river". There is a final round of betting at the higher limit.

After the last round of betting, the pot will awarded to the winning hand.


All Hold 'em games include a small blind and big blind. These are forced bets, and are determined by the position of the button. These bets are considered live, and every player in the hand must either call the big blind, raise, or fold. The button moves clockwise around the table, giving each player a turn being the button, small blind, and big blind.

 

 

[GAME 3] Fix Limit Omaha 8 Hi – Lo


Omaha high-low is a variant of Omaha in which the pot is split between the holder of the highest hand and the holder of the lowest hand if that low hand is topped by no worse than an 8. (The 8 is known in the poker world as a qualifier.) If that restriction is not met, the entire pot goes to the holder of the highest hand. Also, the same hand can win both the high and the low half of the pot. Winning the whole pot in either of these ways is called scooping.

Blinds

Each hand of Omaha high-low starts with two blinds. Blinds are preliminary bets made by two players before cards are dealt for the purpose of stimulating action. If there was nothing to win, the first player to make a decision would have no reason to make a bet. The deal position is indicated by the dealer button. This is the position from which the dealer would distribute cards if the dealer were one of the players. Prior to cards being distributed, the player to the left of the button puts in chips must post the blinds. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)

First Round

When the blinds are in place, the dealer distributes four cards one at a time face down to each player, starting with the little blind. These four starting cards are called hole cards


Each player starts with four hole cards. Then the dealer places five cards face-up in the center of the table. These community cards are part of each player's hand, so each player has access to nine cards. In Omaha high-low, each player can potentially form two five-card hands, a high hand and a low hand. Each hand must adhere to the Omaha restrictions of using only two (no more, no less, but they can be any two) of the hole cards together with only three (no more, no less, but they can be any three) of the five community cards. A different two-card-plus-three-card combination can be use for the low hand and for the high hand. Given that, many more winning combinations are possible in Omaha high-low than in Omaha high.

For example, your hole cards are Ad Kd 3s 2s. The board is Jd 4d 3c Qd 5h. Your best high hand would be an ace-high flush. You make this hand by using Ad Kd from your hand in combination with Jd 4d Qd on the board. Your best low hand would be a wheel. You make this hand by using Ad 2s from your hand in combination with 4d 3c 5h on the board. Both hands are the nuts (the best possible hand for a given situation). Having the best possible low and the best possible high in the same hand is called nut-nut. (You could possibly split the low half of the pot if anyone else has both an ace and a 2. In the case of one other player with that combination, you would get three-fourths of the pot.) This example shows two different sets of five cards being used to form high hand and low hand, while adhering to the Omaha restrictions.


The betting on the first round always starts with the player just to the left of the big blind. You can open the pot or call a bet at the lower limit. There is a maximum of three reraises per betting round.


If you or anyone else opens, each succeeding player has three choices:


• fold
• call, that is, match the preceding bet
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet


Evaluating Your Cards


As you evaluate your cards, realize that since this is a high-low split game, good cards can be low cards as well as high cards. You want to end up with a hand that is best for either high or low-and, ideally, one that can win both high and low (scoop the pot). Keep in mind the qualifier. To end up with a low hand, your starting hand must contain at least two cards 8 or lower. Compared with seven stud high-low, Omaha high-low has a smaller proportion of pots split between high and low on the showdown. In seven stud high-low, since a player can use any five of his seven cards, the likelihood of a low hand is often quite high. An Omaha high-low pot, however, can have a low only if at least three of the community cards are 8 or lower-and even then, it sometimes happens that no player can make a low.


The Flop


Once the betting for the first round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to fold or match the total betting, the dealer deals three cards face up in the center of the table. These first three of the community cards are called the flop.
The second round of betting takes place. In this round, the betting starts with the first active player (one who still has cards) to the left of the button. If the small blind called on the first round, that player would be first to act, even though he was next-to-last on the first round of betting. Only in the first round (sometimes called the preflop round) does the betting start elsewhere. In all rounds after the first, the first player has two choices:


• check, that is, make no bet
• bet at the lower limit (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)


If no one bets, each player in turn has the same choices. It is possible in every round except the first for no betting to occur. No betting in a round is called being checked around.

If anyone bets, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the preceding bet
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet to the lower limit. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)


A player who checks retains his cards. If someone bets, when the action returns, a player who checked has the preceding three choices. To check and then raise when the betting returns is known, reasonably enough, as check-raising. If you check with the intention of raising, you of course risk the possibility that no one will bet.


The Turn

Once the betting for the second round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to check or match the total betting for the round, the dealer deals one more card face up in the center of the table. This fourth of the community cards is called the turn.


The third round of betting takes place now at the higher limit (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits). Again, the betting starts with the first active player to the left of the button. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the second round. In a limit game, in the third round and fourth rounds the betting usually proceeds in increments twice the size of the first two rounds.


The River

Once the betting for the third round is equalized, the dealer deals a fifth and final card face up in the center of the table. This last community card is called the river.
The fourth and final round of betting takes place at the higher limit. Again, the betting starts with the first active player to the left of the button. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the two previous rounds.


Showdown

Once the betting for the fourth round is equalized, the betting is over, and there is a showdown. Remaining active players show their cards. The best high hand, comprised of the best five cards from among two of each player's four hole cards in combination with three of the community cards, wins half the pot. The best low hand (as long as one qualifies by consisting of five different cards 8 or lower), comprised of the best five cards from among two of each player's four hole cards in combination with three of the community cards, wins half the pot. The cards speak to determines the winning hands, and awards half the pot to the holder of each hand. If no hand qualifies for low, the dealers awards the entire pot to the holder of the highest hand. If the same player has a combinations of cards that qualify as both the best high hand and the best low hand, the dealer awards the entire pot to the holder of that hand.


Don't worry about inadvertently misreading your hand and accidentally throwing away a winner. As long as you have called to the end, the cards will speak to determine if you are awarded the pot. You may, for example, have been concentrating so hard on making a low that you don't see that, while you missed the low, you had a straight-and it was the best high hand. If your hand is the best for high or low at the showdown you win.

 

[GAME 4] Razz


Razz is one of the lesser-known poker games. And despite having its own event in the World Series of Poker, you won't find it in many of your local cardrooms.

As in most forms of poker, Razz uses a standard 52-card deck. The game is played at an eight-handed table, and looks very similar to the more familiar 7 card stud. In razz, however, your objective is to make the lowest possible hand.

Each player starts with two hole cards and one upcard; the dealer then gives each active player three more upcards, and then a final downcard. Each player that stays in for every round of betting ends up with seven cards -- four face up and three face down. At the showdown, the player holding the best LOW hand using five of his seven cards wins the pot. Aces are always low, and flushes and straights have no effect on the value of a hand. The best possible hand is A-2-3-4-5.

Each new hand of razz begins with each player putting an ante (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits) into the pot. The ante is a payment into the pot before cards are dealt for the purpose of instigating action. There are no blinds in Razz.
In Razz, the dealer position will move between each hand dealt. The first card of each succeeding round always goes to the first active player to the left of the button.
When the antes are in place, the dealer distributes two cards face down to each player and then one card face up, starting with the first seat left of the dealer button. The two downcards are called hole cards.

Razz, as any form of poker, is about betting. Razz has five betting rounds. The sizes of the bets adhere to our blind schedule. The first two betting rounds are at the lower limit, and the next three at the higher limit.


Third Street

On the first round (known as third street), the betting starts with the player having the highest upcard showing. This bet is a forced bet also knows at the limp-in or bring-in (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits). If two or more players have the same rank of upcard, who must make the bring-in is determined by suit, in bridge order (spades, hearts, diamonds, clubs). This is the only time suits have any bearing in razz. For example, if three queens appear on the first round in this order, Qd, Qh, Qs, the holder of the Qs would be required to make the bring-in bet.

If you open for the bring-in, each succeeding player has three choices:

• fold
• call -- that is, match the bring-in
• raise -- that is, increase the preceding bet to the lower limit. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)

Each player in turn has the same three choices. If there has been a raise, each player who chooses to continue must either call the total bet thus far, or himself raise. In any one round of betting, there can be a maximum of one bet and three raises.


Fourth Street

Once the betting for the round is completed and everyone has had an opportunity either to fold or match the total betting, the dealer deals each active player a second upcard (fourth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting.
The betting on fourth street proceeds at the lower limit. On fourth and all successive streets, the betting always starts with the player showing the lowest board. If two or more players have the same low board, the betting begins with the player closest to the left of the button.

In all rounds after third street, the player first to act has two choices:

• check - that is, make no bet
• bet - that is, make a bet at the proper limit for that round
If no one bets, each player in turn has the same choices. It is possible in every round except third street for no betting to occur. No betting in a round is called being "checked around".

If anyone bets, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call
• raise -- that is, increase the preceding bet

Fifth Street

Once the betting for fourth street is completed and everyone has had an opportunity either to check or match the total betting for the round, the dealer deals each active player a third upcard (fifth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting. The bets on fifth street are always at the higher level, and will remain so for the rest of the betting rounds.

Sixth Street

Once the betting for fifth street is completed, the dealer deals each active player a fourth upcard (sixth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting. Again, these bets are at the higher level.


Seventh Street

Once the betting for sixth street is completed, the dealer deals each active player a final card, face down (seventh street or the river card). Players still in the hand participate in a final round of betting. The betting proceeds exactly the same as in the three previous rounds.
(In the rare event that all eight players remain in the hand at this point, there would not be enough cards for each player to receive an individual card. Should this occur, a single "common" card is placed in the middle of the table face up which every player is free to use.)

Showdown

Once the betting for seventh street is equalized, the betting is over, and there is a showdown. Remaining active players show their cards, and the player making the best low hand using five of their seven cards wins.


[GAME 5] Stud Hi


Stud Hi, or seven-card stud, is probably the poker game with which those who have played only in homes are most familiar.

As in most forms of poker, Stud Hi uses a standard 52-card deck. The game is played at an eight-handed table.

Each new hand of Stud Hi begins with each player putting an ante (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits) into the pot. The ante is a payment into the pot before cards are dealt for the purpose of instigating action. There are no blinds in Stud.
In Stud Hi, the dealer button will move between each hand dealt. The first card of each succeeding round always goes to the first active player to the left of the button.

When the antes are in place, the dealer distributes two cards face down to each player and then one card face up, starting with seat 1. The two downcards are called hole cards.

Stud Hi, as any form of poker, is about betting. Stud Hi has five betting rounds. The sizes of the bets depend on the structure of the game. All Stud Hi games at Full Tilt Poker are limit games. Usually the first two rounds are at one level, and the next three at double that level. There is one exception to this, in which sometimes the second round of betting is optionally at the higher level.

Third Street

On the first round (known as third street), the betting starts with the player having the lowest upcard. This bet is a forced bet. The bet must be at least a specified minimum, in which case it is called the bring-in (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits). If two or more players have the same rank of upcard, who must make the bring-in is determined by suit, in reverse bridge order (clubs, diamonds, hearts, spades). This is one of the few times that suits have any bearing in poker. For example, if three deuces appear on the first round in this order, 2s, 2h, 2d, the holder of the 2d would be required to make the bring-in bet.
• open for the bring-in
• complete the bet, that is, increase the bet to the lower limit

Normally everyone would not fold for a bring-in, however.
If you open for the bring-in, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the bring-in
• complete the bet, that is, increase the bet to the lower limit
If you or anyone else completes the bet, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the bring-in
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet

Each player in turn has the same three choices. If there has been a raise, each player who chooses to continue must either call the total bet thus far or himself raise. In any one round of betting, there can be a maximum of one bet and three raises. Doing so would cap the betting for that round, that is, cause it to reach the maximum.

Fourth Street

Once the betting for the round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to fold or match the total betting, the dealer deals each active player a second upcard (fourth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting.

The betting on fourth street normally proceeds at the lower limit. *** The exception is that if any board shows an open pair, any player may choose to bet or raise at the higher limit.

On fourth and all successive streets, the betting always starts with the player showing the highest board. If two or more players have the same high board, the betting begins with the player closest to the left of the stud button. In the picture, since you are closer to the stud button than the other player who holds ace-deuce, you are first to bet.


The situation is exactly the same if the tied hands are pairs. For example, if two players show 7-7, the one closer to the stud button starts the betting.


In all rounds after third street, the player first to act has two choices:

• check, that is, make no bet
• make a bet at the proper lower limit bet for that round

If no one bets, each player in turn has the same choices. It is possible in every round except third street for no betting to occur. No betting in a round is called being checked around.

If anyone bets, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the bring-in
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet

A player who checks retains his cards. If someone bets, when the action returns, a player who previously checked has the preceding three choices. To check and then raise when the betting returns is known, reasonably enough, as check-raising. If you check with the intention of raising, you of course risk the possibility that no one will bet.

Fifth Street
Once the betting for fourth street is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to check or match the total betting for the round, the dealer deals each active player a third upcard (fifth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting. The bets on fifth street are always at the higher level.

Sixth Street

Once the betting for fifth street is equalized, the dealer deals each active player a fourth upcard (sixth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting. The bets on sixth street remain at the higher level.

Seventh Street

Once the betting for sixth street is equalized, the dealer deals each active player a final card, face down (seventh street or the river card). Players still in the hand participate in a final round of betting. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the three previous rounds.

Showdown

Once the betting for seventh street is equalized, the betting is over, and there is a showdown. Remaining active players show their cards and the best hand, comprised of the best five cards from among each player's seven, wins.
Don't worry about inadvertently misreading your hand, cards speak.

 

[GAME 6] Poker 2-11 Fix Limit

Poker 2-11 Fixed Limit is a variant of Omaha. The game of 2-11 allows each player to choose whether to use two or three cards from their four-card hand with two or three cards from the four-card board to make their best five-card high hand.
Blinds
Each hand of Poker 2-11 FL starts with two blinds. Blinds are preliminary bets made by two players before cards are dealt for the purpose of stimulating action. The deal position is indicated by the dealer button. This is the position from which the dealer would distribute cards if the dealer were one of the players. Prior to cards being distributed, the player to the left of the button puts in chips must post the blinds. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)

First Round
When the blinds are in place, the dealer distributes four cards one at a time face down to each player, starting with the little blind. These four starting cards are called hole cards

Each player starts with four hole cards. Then the dealer places four cards (Not Five) face-up in the center of the table. These community cards are part of each player's hand, so each player has access to nine cards. In Poker 2-11, each player can form the best five-card hands. Each hand must use only two cards of the hole cards together with only three (no more, no less, but they can be any three) of the four community cards. Or the player can use three cards from his hole cards together with only two (no more, no less, but they can be any two) of the four community cards. This choice what makes Poker 2-11 an new and very exciting variant of Omaha.
The betting on the first round always starts with the player just to the left of the big blind. You can open the pot or call a bet at the lower limit. There is a maximum of three reraises per betting round.
If you or anyone else opens, each succeeding player has three choices:

• fold
• call, that is, match the preceding bet
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet

Evaluating Your Cards

As you evaluate your cards, realize that you can make your best hand with either two or three cards from your hole cards. in

The Flop

Once the betting for the first round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to fold or match the total betting, the dealer deals two cards face up in the center of the table. These two community cards are called the flop (Poker 2-11 only uses two cards on the flop oppose to three in Omaha).

The second round of betting takes place. In this round, the betting starts with the first active player (one who still has cards) to the left of the button. If the small blind called on the first round, that player would be first to act, even though he was next-to-last on the first round of betting. Only in the first round (sometimes called the preflop round) does the betting start elsewhere. In all rounds after the first, the first player has two choices:

• check, that is, make no bet
• bet at the lower limit (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)

If no one bets, each player in turn has the same choices. It is possible in every round except the first for no betting to occur. No betting in a round is called being checked around.
If anyone bets, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the preceding bet
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet to the lower limit. (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits)

A player who checks retains his cards. If someone bets, when the action returns, a player who checked has the preceding three choices. To check and then raise when the betting returns is known, reasonably enough, as check-raising. If you check with the intention of raising, you of course risk the possibility that no one will bet.

The Turn

Once the betting for the second round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to check or match the total betting for the round, the dealer deals one more card face up in the center of the table. This fourth of the community cards is called the turn.

The third round of betting takes place now at the higher limit (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits). Again, the betting starts with the first active player to the left of the button. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the second round. In a limit game, in the third round and fourth rounds the betting usually proceeds in increments twice the size of the first two rounds.

The River

Once the betting for the third round is equalized, the dealer deals a fifth and final card face up in the center of the table. This last community card is called the river.
The fourth and final round of betting takes place at the higher limit. Again, the betting starts with the first active player to the left of the button. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the two previous rounds.

Showdown

Once the betting for the fourth round is equalized, the betting is over, and there is a showdown. Remaining active players show their cards. The best high hand, comprised of the best five cards from among two of each player's four hole cards in combination with two or three of the community cards. The cards speak and the dealer will determine the winning hand.

Don't worry about inadvertently misreading your hand and accidentally throwing away a winner. As long as you have called to the end, the cards will speak to determine if you are awarded the pot. You may, for example, have been concentrating so hard on using only two of your hole cards and that you don't see that, you actually made a better hand using three cards from your hole cards with two cards from the board.

 

[GAME 7] No Limit 2-7 Single Draw


2-7 Single Draw, also known as Kansas City Lowball, is a draw poker game where the player with the best low hand wins the pot. Each player is dealt five cards to start, and then has the chance to discard any cards in their hand in exchange for new cards during the draw round.

Playing for the Low Hand

• Flushes, straights and pairs count against your hand
• The Ace is always considered a high card

This means that the hand A-2-3-4-5 is not considered a straight, but T-J-K-Q-A is.
The best possible hand in 2-7 Single Draw is 7-5-4-3-2 (not of the same suit), also known as "the nuts" or "the wheel". Low hands are always counted from the highest card to the lowest card, so it's usually the highest card in your hand that counts the most. For example, 9-7-6-4-3 is a better hand than T-7-6-4-2.
If the high cards are of equal value, the next highest card (or cards) comes into play. For example, 9-7-6-4-3 beats 9-8-6-4-3..

Blinds and Antes

Like flop-based games such as Hold 'em, draw games feature blinds to stimulate action at the table. The small blind and big blind are assigned to the players to the left of the dealer button, which determines the order in which cards are dealt.

The Deal and First Round of Betting

Once the blinds are posted, the hand is underway. With 2-7 Single Draw, five cards are dealt face down to each player in the hand, starting with the player to the left of the dealer button.

After the cards are dealt, the first round of betting ensues. Starting with the player to the left of the big blind, each player has the option to fold their hand, call the current bet or raise it up! If no one raises, the player in the big blind has the option to check their hand, meaning that player makes no bet but still retains their hand.
No Limit 2-7 Single Draw betting structure, means you can bet all of your chips at any point in the hand.

The Draw

When the first round of betting is complete, all players still in the hand have the option to discard any or all of their cards and draw new ones. Choose the cards you want to discard when it's your turn to act.

If you prefer not to discard any cards, you have the option to "Stand Pat".
Once all players have discarded, new cards will be drawn from the deck and each player will be dealt the same number of cards which they discarded.

***Please note: In draw games, it's possible for more cards to be needed than are available in the deck. In this case, a reshuffling of the deck will take place.

The Final Betting Round and Showdown

After the draw, a final round of betting takes place, beginning with the first player to the left of the button. If no one has bet, you have the option to check your hand or make a bet. If you're facing a bet, you have the option to fold, call or raise.

When the last round of betting is complete, a showdown takes place with any players still remaining in the hand. The player with the best low hand wins the pot! If there is a tie for the best hand, the pot will be split equally amongst the tied players.

**** Reshuffling the Deck
In draw games, it's possible there will be more cards needed than are available in the deck. When all of the original 52 cards from the deck have been distributed, any folded or discarded cards may be reshuffled and used for a draw.
The rules for reshuffling the deck in draw poker games are as follows:

• During a draw round, the remainder of the original deck is first distributed to the players in the order in which they discarded

• If there are insufficient cards remaining in the original deck during a draw round, a reshuffle is required

• For the first draw or games with only one draw: the deck is reshuffled using the folded cards first, and then the discards if necessary

• For the subsequent draw rounds: the deck is reshuffled using the folded cards and discards from previous draw rounds first, and then the discards from the current round if necessary.


Please note, that it is possible for you to draw a card you have previously discarded if discards are needed for the reshuffle.

 

 

[GAME 8] Stud 8 Hi Lo

Seven-card stud Hi/Lo is a variant of Seven-card stud in which the pot is split between the holder of the highest hand and the holder of the lowest hand if that low hand is topped by no worse than an 8. (The 8 is known in the poker world as a qualifier.) If that restriction is not met, the entire pot goes to the holder of the highest hand. Also, the same hand can win both the high and the low half of the pot. Winning the whole pot in either of these ways is called scooping.

The game is also called seven stud high-low and/or, Seven-card stud 8-or-better.

General
Just as in the high version of Seven-card stud, each player starts with two hole cards and one upcard, and then the dealer gives each active player three more upcards, and then a final downcard. Thus each player ends up with seven cards, four face up and three face down. The difference between Seven-card stud high and Seven-card stud Hi/Lo is that in Seven-card stud Hi/Lo each player can potentially have two different hands, a high hand and a low hand.

Each player forms a five card high hand by using five of his seven cards. Each player forms a five card low hand by using five of his seven cards. Both the high hand combination and the low hand combination can use the same set of five cards, but they don't have to; in fact, usually they would not. For example, if your seven cards are Kh 8h 5c 4h 3h 2s Ah, your high hand is Ah Kh 8h 4h 3h, an ace-high flush, while your low hand is 5c 4h 3h 2s Ah, a wheel. Here is a hand that uses the same five cards for low and for high: Ks Qh 8s 7d 6c 5h 4c. The high hand is an 8-high straight and the low hand is 8-7-6-5-4.


Each new hand of Stud Hi begins with each player putting an ante (See the Blind Schedule for all betting limits) into the pot. The ante is a payment into the pot before cards are dealt for the purpose of instigating action. There are no blinds in Stud.
In Stud 8, the dealer button will move between each hand dealt. The first card of each succeeding round always goes to the first active player to the left of the button.
When the antes are in place, the dealer distributes two cards face down to each player and then one card face up, starting with seat 1. The two downcards are called hole cards.

Seven stud Hi/Lo, as any form of poker, is about betting. Seven stud Hi/Lo has five betting rounds. The sizes of the bets depend on the structure of the game.. The first two rounds are at the lower limit, and the next three at the higher level.

Third Street

On the first round (known as third street), the betting starts with the player having the lowest upcard. This bet is a forced bet. The bet must be at least a specified minimum, in which case it is called the bring-in, but can be more. The bring-in is usually one-fourth the lower limit. If two or more players have the same rank of upcard, who must make the bring-in is determined by suit, in reverse bridge order (clubs, diamonds, hearts, spades). This is one of the few times that suits have any bearing in poker. For example, if three deuces appear on the first round in this order, 2s, 2h, 2d, the holder of the 2d would be required to make the bring-in bet.

In the picture above you have the lowest card. You must make a bet. You have two choices only.

You can:
• open for the bring-in
• complete the bet, that is, increase the bet to the lower limit

If you open for the bring-in, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the bring-in
• complete the bet, that is, increase the bet to the lower limit

If you or anyone else completes the bet, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the bring-in
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet

Each player in turn has the same three choices. If there has been a raise, each player who chooses to continue must either call the total bet thus far or himself raise. In any one round of betting, there can be a maximum of one bet and three raises.

As you evaluate your cards, realize that since this is a Hi/Lo split game, good cards can be low cards as well as high cards. You want to end up with a hand that is best for either high or low-and, ideally, one that can win both high and low (scoop the pot). Keep in mind the qualifier. If you are trying to build a low hand, cards 9 and higher lessen your chances. Compared with Omaha Hi/Lo, Seven-card Stud Hi/Lo has a greater proportion of pots split between high and low on the showdown. An Omaha Hi/Lo pot can have a low only if at least three of the community cards are 8 or lower-and even then, it sometimes happens that no player can make a low. In Seven-card Stud Hi/Lo, however, since a player can use any five of his Seven-cards, the likelihood of a low hand is often quite high.

Fourth Street

Once the betting for the first round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to fold or match the total betting, the dealer deals each active player a second upcard (fourth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting. The betting on fourth street proceeds at the lower limit.

The only betting difference between Seven-card Stud Hi/Lo and Seven-card Stud is that in Seven-card Stud Hi/Lo the appearance in anyone's board of a pair on fourth street does not offer an optional increase in the betting limit. In Seven-card stud Hi/Lo, the first two betting rounds are always at the lower limit and the last three always at the higher limit.

On fourth and all successive streets, the betting always starts with the player showing the highest board. If two or more players have the same high board, the betting begins with the player closest to the left of the stud button.

The situation is exactly the same if the tied hands are pairs. For example, if two players show 7-7, the one closer to the stud button starts the betting.

In all rounds after third street, the player first to act has two choices:
• check, that is, make no bet
• make a bet at the proper limit for that round

If no one bets, each player in turn has the same choices. It is possible in every round except third street for no betting to occur. No betting in a round is called being checked around.

If anyone bets, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the bring-in
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet

A player who checks retains his cards. If someone bets, when the action returns, a player who previously checked has the preceding three choices. To check and then raise when the betting returns is known, reasonably enough, as check-raising. If you check with the intention of raising, you of course risk the possibility that no one will bet.

Fifth Street

Once the betting for fourth street is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to check or match the total betting for the round, the dealer deals each active player a third upcard (fifth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting. The bets on fifth street are at the higher level.

Sixth Street

Once the betting for fifth street is equalized, the dealer deals each active player a fourth upcard (sixth street). Players still in the hand participate in a round of betting. The bets on sixth street remain at the higher level.

Seventh Street
Once the betting for sixth street is equalized, the dealer deals each active player a final card, face down (seventh street or the river card). Players still in the hand participate in a final round of betting. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the three previous rounds.

Showdown

Once the betting for seventh street is equalized, the betting is over, and there is a showdown. Remaining active players show their cards. The best high hand, comprised of the best five cards from among each player's seven, wins half the pot. The best low hand (as long as one qualifies by consisting of five different cards 8 or lower), comprised of the best five cards from among each player's seven, wins half the pot.
Don't worry about inadvertently misreading your hand, cards always speak, as long as you have called to the end.

 

 

[GAME 9] No Limit Hold'em

 

Texas Hold 'em-or just Hold 'em, as most players know it-is probably the best known and most popular form of poker today.

Blinds

Each hand of Hold 'em starts with two blinds. Blinds are preliminary bets made by two players before cards are dealt for the purpose of stimulating action. If there was nothing to win, the first player to make a decision would have no reason to make a bet. The deal position is indicated by the dealer button, or, simply, the button. This is the position from which the dealer would distribute cards if the dealer were one of the players

First Round

When the blinds are in place, the dealer distributes first one card and then another face down to each player, starting with the little blind. These two starting cards are called hole cards

Each player starts with two cards, and then five cards are placed face-up in the center of the table. These community cards are part of each player's hand, so each player has access to seven cards. Each player tries to make the best possible poker hand by using five of the seven cards. Since a poker hand consists of exactly five cards, only the best five of the seven cards play.

No Limit Hold’em has a betting stucture where you can bet up to your entire stack at any time during the hand.

The betting on the first round always starts with the player just to the left of the big blind. This position is sometimes called under the gun. As the first player, you have three choices. You can:
• fold
• open for the minimum (limp)
• open for a raise

If you fold at any point, your cards are removed from play and no longer appear on the screen, you are out until the next hand, and you have no further interest in the pot. If you fold, the next player has the same choices. If everyone folds, including the small blind, the pot goes to the big blind, and the next hand is dealt.
If you or anyone else opens, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the preceding bet
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet

Each player in turn has the same three choices. If there has been a raise, each player who chooses to continue must either call the total bet thus far or himself raise. In any one round of betting, there can be a maximum of one bet plus three raises. When the betting (also called action) gets to the blinds, they have the same choices. However, they already have chips in the pot, and those chips count towards their bet.

The Flop

Once the betting for the round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to fold or match the total betting, the dealer deals three cards face up in the center of the table. These first three of the community cards are called the flop.

The second round of betting takes place. In this round, the betting starts with the first active player (one who still has cards) to the left of the button. If the small blind called on the first round, that player would be first to act, even though he was next-to-last on the first round of betting. Only in the first round (sometimes called the preflop round) does the betting start elsewhere. In all rounds after the first, the first player has two choices:
• check, that is, make no bet
• bet, that is, make a bet at the proper limit for that round

If no one bets, each player in turn has the same choices. It is possible in every round except the first for no betting to occur. No betting in a round is called being checked around.
If anyone bets, each succeeding player has three choices:
• fold
• call, that is, match the preceding bet
• raise, that is, increase the preceding bet

A player who checks retains his cards. If someone bets, when the action returns, a player who checked has the preceding three choices. To check and then raise when the betting returns is known, reasonably enough, as check-raising. If you check with the intention of raising, you of course risk the possibility that no one will bet.

The Turn

Once the betting for the second round is equalized, that is, once everyone has had an opportunity either to check or match the total betting for the round, the dealer deals one more card face up in the center of the table. This fourth of the community cards is called the turn.

The third round of betting takes place. Again, the betting starts with the first active player to the left of the button. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the second round. In a limit game, in the third round and fourth rounds the betting usually proceeds in increments twice the size of the first two rounds.

The River

Once the betting for the third round is equalized, the dealer deals a fifth and final card face up in the center of the table. This last community card is called the river.
The fourth and final round of betting takes place. Again, the betting starts with the first active player to the left of the button. The betting proceeds exactly the same as the two previous rounds.

Showdown

Once the betting for the fourth round is equalized, the betting is over, and there is a showdown. Remaining active players show their cards and the best hand, comprised of the best five cards from among each player's combination of two hole cards plus the community cards, wins. The holder of the winning hand is awarded the pot.
Don't worry about inadvertently misreading your hand, cards always speak, as long as you have called to the end.

 

 

[GAME 10] Pot Limit Omaha Hi

Pot Limit Omaha Hi, is a variation of Hold 'em played with four hole cards instead of two. At showdown, the best five-card hand using exactly two of your hole cards and three cards from the board wins. Unlike Hold 'em, you may not use more than three cards from the board. The betting and blinds are exactly the same as in Hold 'em.
At the beginning of each hand, each player is dealt four hole cards. There is a small blind, a big blind, and a round of betting.

In Pot Limit, a player can bet any amount from the minimum bet to the size of the pot. In a $5/$10 pot-limit game, the small blind is $5 and the big blind is $10. The first player can call the big blind (in this case, $10), or raise to any amount up to the size of the pot. A raise must either equal or exceed the previous bet or raise. In this case, a pot-sized raise would be $25 ($5 small blind + $10 big blind + $10 call), meaning that, in total, player three can bet up $35. Supposing player three makes a pot-sized raise, the total pot is now $50.

If the next player wants into the hand, they must call $35, which is the size of player three's bet. If they want to raise the maximum, they would bet $120, which equals the size of the pot ($50) plus a $70 raise ($35 call + $35 raise).

Once the first round of betting is complete, the dealer then puts out a three card flop, just as in Hold 'em. There is a round of betting. In the above example, the minimum bet would be $10 (the size of the big blind), and the maximum bet would be the size of the pot.
All raises in all remaining rounds behave as described above.
The dealer then puts out a fourth (or turn) card, followed by a round of betting.
The dealer then puts out a fifth (or river) card, followed by a round of betting.
The winner is the player who makes the best possible five card hand using exactly two cards from their hand and three cards from the board.
This is important. Unlike Hold 'em, in Omaha Hi Poker you cannot use just one card from your hand, nor can you play the board.

For example:
Your hand: Ah Kc Qc Jc The board: 3h 4h 5h 6h 7h
You DO NOT have an ace-high nut flush, nor can you simply play the board for a straight flush. Using two cards from your hand, your best hand is:
Ah Kc 7h 6h 5h
In other words, you should have folded